Travel Bites: Panmure Golf Club, Scotland

The unique looking clubhouse at the Panmure Golf Club (Photo: Scott MacLeod)
The unique looking clubhouse at the Panmure Golf Club (Photo: Scott MacLeod)
The unique looking clubhouse at the Panmure Golf Club (Photo: Scott MacLeod)

Often overlooked in favour of nearby Carnoustie Golf Links, the Panmure Golf Club is not to be missed on a trip to the Angus region of Scotland.

The club was founded in 1845, making it among the first twenty golf clubs formed in the world.

Previously located on the Monifieth links, the course was moved to its present site in Barry in 1899.

What you will find today is an interesting mix of holes, many working along a rail line, that were greatly influenced by the suggestions of James Braid in 1922.

The most notable chapter in the club’s modern era came in the summer of 1953.  It was on their course that Ben Hogan practiced for two straight weeks to become accustomed to the smaller British ball.  He would go on to capture the Open Championship at Carnoustie.

Hogan’s favourite hole at the course was #6, a tough par four that requires great precision, right up Hogan’s alley.  He suggested the small pot bunker to the right of the putting surface on the hole.  It was called “Hogan’s Bunker” and has kept the moniker for the last five decades.

Although a member’s club Panmure does accept visitors and those with an affinity for Hogan lore should ensure a stopover on their next visit to Scotland.

More information on the club can be found at their website at this link.