Marc-Etienne Bussieres Wins PGA Championship of Canada

Martc-Etienne Bussieres wins the PGA Championship of Canada (Photo: PGA of Canada)
Martc-Etienne Bussieres wins the PGA Championship of Canada (Photo: PGA of Canada)
Martc-Etienne Bussieres wins the PGA Championship of Canada (Photo: PGA of Canada)

Gatineau, Quebec-raised Marc-Etienne Bussieres proved triumphant on Thursday at the PGA Championship of Canada sponsored by Mr. Lube and presented by TaylorMade Canada.

Bussieres, 29, now works as an Assistant Professional at the Club de Golf Longchamp, beat out one of Canada’s top players among golf professionals, Billy Walsh of Markham, Ontario, to win the prestigious title.

Their final match was a heavy-weight battle over the much-revered Victoria Golf Club.

The pair were neck and neck for most of the day until the Quebec native pulled away at the end to prevail by a score of 3&1.

The new champion, a graduate of the University of South Alabama and amongst the best amateurs to come out of Quebec in the last decade, was more than pleased with the result. Not only does he earn $15,000 for the win but he gets his name on the P.D. Ross trophy. It was provided by and named after the National Capital area newspaper publisher who was a prominent member at the Royal Ottawa Golf Club. Coincidentally that was the club Marc-Etienne played out of at the end of his amateur career.

Bussieres says he did not have a lot of competitive preparation heading into the tournament but there were indications his game was ready to shine. That was re-affirmed when he was the #1 seed in the stroke play portion of the championship this week.

“We just finished our first event our first event of the season on the CCPT (Circuit Canadian Pro Tour) and I knew I was hitting it pretty good. I hadn’t played much earlier before that because I was working a lot actually. You know 45 hours a week in the shop and 90 hours of lessons in a month so that fills up the schedule a lot.”

Even given the schedule and lack of prep, he says he had hopes for the week in Victoria. His ball-striking was good and his putter was red hot early in the week.

“I didn’t quite have the same feelings I had the first couple days but I was still pretty comfortable,” he said of his putting.

The young pro nows joins the likes of Arnold Palmer and Moe Norman with his name on the P.D Ross Trophy, one of the oldest in golf, and he is well aware of the significance.

“It’s great to be part of the history, especially with your name right beside those guys. It doesn’t mean you are equal, definitely not, those guys have a whole lot more history, but hopefully I can put my name on a couple other trophies eventually.”

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